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of people but he is also very hardheaded about things like the economy. when he got into office, they had been really sapped by sanctions for all these years and could have gone either way. look at zimbabwe next door. interesting because you mentioned the sanctions risk. there was a divide in this country about the sanctions. reagan was slow to act and there was a lot of pressure or members of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. t
policy finally sorted out which is very positive for the world economy as well. there seems to be the argument -- they are talking that the normal , he ise of unemployment looking at that and going, we can fix that. we cannot better paid jobs, more jobs, we can change the dynamic through innovation and thinking about the problems that we face. how realistic is that? do with the unemployed men story on both sides of the atlantic? >> i am having lunch with larry today. i will carry on afterwards with him. if i could just revert to the ec1 investing enough. investing has been very poor. we are sitting on huge amounts of money. ins of people want to invest u.k. plc. the announcement earlier in the week, opening the doors to create higher-paying jobs. we are creating very poorly paid jobs. we have to create higher-paying jobs here in the u.k. and create real economic growth. the u.s. has a similar problem. wages haven't risen for over 20 years. we have been doing something's wrong. of investmentck in infrastructure and other areas. we have exported to much of our capital expendit
. considerable fiscal constraints. we're going to see environment -- it will allow for the underlying economy to look stronger. >> the bloomberg political analyst is with us -- sequestration in 2014 is different for him last year. >> they realize -- both sides realize they made a huge mistake. interesting point to me, we had a stock market high. we have housing rates out. we have more millionaires and billionaires. you have all of this data and then you have 75% of the country saying we are on the wrong track. >> will that look like going forward when you deal with the restructuring of fannie and freddie? will we see tightening standards and will that hurt the economy even more? >> i think that is one of the challenges. there are lasting scars. we will continue to see regulatory changes and adjustments. one of those is in the mortgage market. >> can i get a mortgage in 2014? doesn't change the radically that i cannot the mortgage? >> we could see some listening, but when we look back, it will look fundamentally different than what we had during the bubble. >> let's look at today's jobs report
for the goods in china and other nations. the cap the world's economy humming. it may not work that way anymore . a rebounding u.s. is giving less support for you -- for global growth than it has in the past. the smallest u.s. current account deficits since 1999 shows the trend and the discovery of new domestic sources of oil and gas, it reinforces this issue. the country is spending less on imported energy." you can read the full story on bloomberg's website. the front page of "the pittsburgh post-gazette" -- a look at some of the victims from one year ago and a story that will likely get a lot of attention in the week ahead. this is from "the detroit free press" -- you can get more information by logging on to freep.com. next is robert from massachusetts. decline andre in the reason is because we, as a viewed -- when the world our opinion not to go to war, we would not go with our allies. we are ia country that has of thed because one world sees our moral fabric has declined, that is a decline any way. when bush stole the election world looked the --it is not a has way we go about the world.
:30 eastern time. a dow jones survey finds that the economy probably added 180,000 jobs last month. the unemployment rate is seen slipping 7.2%. we'll talk more about market expectations in just a few minutes, but we begin this morning with our top story. nelson mandela spent 27 years in prison, led his country to democracy and became its first black president. he died at home yesterday at the age of 95. chris takes a look at mandela's life and legacy. >> history books will remember nelson mandela as one of the world' most prominent crusaders for black rights, the son of an african tribal chief, nelson mandela gave up a comfortable life and his hereditary lights to be a tribal leader to become a political activist in the fight against apartheid. the system of white rule over the majority black population. >> to feel that it is for us to continue talking nonviolence and peace. >> he was jailed for organizing demonstrations as well as treason and sabotage. he spent 27 years behind bars, but his jailing fueled the fires of freedom. his plight became an international symbol of oppressi
to the economy an-for-a change so many good news. the november's job's report shows the unemployment rate fell to an all time low. the u.s. economy gained moore jomorejobs than expected. and the gains are wide spread in low and high conditions. it's i something that is key to today's economic news. >> i always kind a reason to find i this report shea shairky. the unemployment rate is down and we have created 200,000 jobs every month but a quarter of the jobs were higher payin paying j6 an hour or more. that is what wei we are concernd about. 1:5 is still low paying. that is part 69 problem. >> of the problem. it's not gang busters and teabs noit'snot a raw numbers thing. sgenerally speaking the qawl quy of jobs is higher. >> at first glance it would appear it's a big deal, but is it? world gets ou obsessed with the unemployment rate. >> i couldn't care less. that number measures a group of people in a changing group of larkehearingerlarger people. i do don't care about that number. more than 150,000 joan because that is the number of more people that come into the work force every month than
to the latest news of the day. jobs and the economy, we have the details. patricia, good to see you. this is a much better than expected jobs report. >> it was tin deed much better. but the numbers were encouraging, and there was reason to be cautious. >> reporter: the economy shows signs of improvement. lowering the unemployment rate to 7%. there was a healthy bump in higher paying manufacturing and construction. the numbers indicate the economic recover is gaining strength. >> we've had 45 consecutive months. >> while encouraging, there is still a long way to go. >> the economy will have to create between 200,000 to 225,000 jobs per month for the next couple of years. >> reporter: that may be difficult to achieve. the recovery is still on shaky ground with small businesses seeing a slow down for the year. that's significant because those businesses create two-thirds of new jobs. particularly hard hit has been the retail sector. despite slashing prices and opening their doors thanksgiving day retailers posted disappointing sales in november. >> you have a vicious circle if úpeople
the jobs front about a divide in the u.s. economy: the labor market seems to be getting stronger once again. yet for many on the lower end of the income ladder, the big gap in wages is sparking a budding movement. we begin with economics correspondent paul solman on the unemployment rate's drop to a five-year low, even as many jobless americans face more difficult times ahead. the story is part of paul's coverage on making sense of financial news. >> reporter: the latest snapshot of the nation's jobs situation-- showing 203,000 positions added in november, and a jobless rate of 7% was even rosier than anticipated. we asked northeastern university economist barry bluestone what he made of the numbers. >> on balance this was a good report today. over 200,000 people are back to work. we've brought the unemployment rate down from 7.3% to 7%. that's all good news. of course many of those were federal employees coming back to work after furlough, but we had some good news about manufacturing employment, construction employment, pretty much across the board. so in general this is good news plus o
? >> describe the state of how you see the south african economy and the relationship between the united states and this current south african government. >> it's a dynamic moment in the relationship, chuck. you know that the fastest growing economies on the globe are in africa. south africa is the economy that has been stagnant over the course of the last few years following the recession that all of us are struggling to recover from. i will tell you that over 600 american countries on the ground here in south africa are bullish and optimistic about the future here spent a lot of time talking to both investors and young people who were entering the job market here and they are optimistic about the opportunities, but they know there real challenges particularly around education to make certain there is a sustainable economy and the shared prosperity this this country. >> one of the things i want to do with you, you were talking with andrea off camera and i am glad you brought up the cold war point. history and a reminder of what that -- how frankly we were behind the times as a government when
recession. but what kind of jobs is the economy creating? an ice storm causes havoc in the middle of the country. manuel bojorquez is there. and allen pizzey on the years that made the man. >> for 18 of the 27 years he spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of that walk there was no freedom, there was this. >> reporter: with bob simon on the moment he was free. >> after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the south african government announced today that the state funeral for former president nelson mandela will be a week from sunday-- the culmination of days of memorial services. president obama will lead the u.s. delegation and he's invited the former american presidents to join him. mourners continued to gather today at mandela's home in johannrg died last night and at his former home in soweto. and for us, no one image captured his legacy better than this-- blacks and whites side by side honoring the father of a mu
's everyday reinvesting for your personal economy. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is. 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energy efficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. i have a great fit with my dentures. i love kiwis. i've always had that issue with the seeds getting under my denture. super poligrip free -- it creates a seal of the dentures in my mouth. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. super poligrip free made the kiwi an enjoyable experience. [ arlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. >>> i'm harris faulkner. this is "the fox report." it is the bottom of the hour. if you're joining us, an american u.s. veteran jailed in north korea is finally home tonight. 85-year-old merrill newman says he tried and he's tired and rea
are furious about the failure to sign a trade deal with eu and turn to moscow to save the economy. >> translator: i want a new government that listens to the people and doesn't treat us like animals. >> translator: we are here to fight for our rights and our kids are brought up in a good country without corruption and where everything is fair. >> reporter: the crisis here is reaching a crucial moment and he believes he can survive with moscow's help but they are ready for a long fight to achieve aims and i'm tim friend with al jazeera. >> leaders lack constitutional power to oust the government before the presidential election in 2015. a riot breaks out in singapore's little india district after an india national was struck and killed by a bus. crowds attached police and set cars on fire and dozens were injured and 27 people were arrested. it was singapore's first major riot in four decades. and the president of venezuela won half of the elections on sunday and held control in the oil city and the capitol caracas and inflation is 54% and power outages and shortages of necessiti
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: nelson mandela's death was formally announced late today by south africa's current president jacob zuma. he expressed the country's love and sense of loss for their iconic leader, often referred to, out of respect, by his clan name, madiba. >> our beloved mandela, thefounr democratic nation, has departed. he passed on peacefully, in the company of his family, around 2050, on the 5th of december, 2013. he is now resting. he is now at peace. is our nation has lost -- our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. although we knew that this day would come, nothing can diminish our sen
karzai of afghanistan. >>> next, how to understand the booming american economy. i'll ask the man who presided over great growth and some critics charge also helped create many bubbles. former fed chair alan greenspan. and as we approach the first anniversary of the newtown massacre, what can the u.s. learn from other nations about gun policy? i'll take you to japan for a fascinating look at a nation that loves violent video games but has a gun death rate that is very different from america's. it's a preview of a "gps" special airing tonight at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >>> but first, here is my take. when nelson mandela was released from prison in 1990, i remember being struck by how old-f old-fashioned he seemed. he spoke with the language, kay dance and manner of figures from the 1940s and '50s. as someone who grew up in india he reminded me of the videos i had seen of mahut ma gandhi and nero. he had the same formal way of speaking and dressing, the same dignity of bearing, the same sense of history. and mandela really was a throwback to an older time of great leaders who through courage
to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to retail to transportation to construction so there's broad based health care as well, that's important here. carol, the trend, i always talk about the trend how important that is. you look at the last four months on average, 200,000 plus jobs over the last four months and carol we are on track this year for the most jobs created since 2005. we're on track for more than 2 million jobs created and that is a marked improvement from what we've seen in recent memory, so this is good news, a 7% unemployment rate is still good news. you'll hear people talk about their concerns about this underemployment rate, 13.2%, people who are unemployed
in our economy and it really, while it seems good, it actually does a disservice to the people you're trying to help. my customers can shop around-- see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment optis and estimates for how much i'll pay. that helps me, and my guys, make better decisions. i don't like guesses with my business, and definitely not with our health. innovations that work for you. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. bill: fox news alert. it is 9:30 in new york. we're watching a story where a gunman barricaded himself inside of a hospital in arizona now surrendering. that man walked into phoenix baptist hospital, 2:00 in the morning pulled out a knife. police took the knife away, he pulled out a gun. locked himself in a room. surrendered a few hours later. luckily in phoenix no one hurt. heather: rand paul throwing cold water on president obama's suggestion of extending unemployment benefits. speaking on "fox news sunday" the republican s
in jobs. does president obama deserve credit for improving the u.s. economy after a surprisingly strong employment report? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> a ten-day mourning period is under way for one of the most influential leaders of our time. we're learning more about the final tributes to nelson mandela. stand by for that, and for my special conversation with the former president, bill clinton. he reveals a time when he and the south african president didn't see eye-to-eye but first, the breaking news we're following. >>> a brutal winter storm turns deadly. at least four people have been killed on icy roads in the southern u.s. we're seeing a dangerous mix of snow, sleet, freezing rain and bone-chilling cold, and it's creating hazardous conditions from texas to tennessee and beyond. now a one-two punch of weather misery is on the way, affecting both coasts from now through monday. we have team coverage beginning with our meteorologist jennifer gray at the cnn weather center. jennifer, what's going on? >> well, we are getting that one-two punch. we have this on
rate fell to a 5-year low and is at 7%. the economy gained more jobs than expected adding 2003 positions. they were low spread in high and low positions. mike viqueira has more from the white house. >> new unemployment figures are good from the white house. they've been waiting for this. whether or not 7% matters economicallily or to any people for millions out of work, and those who have given up looking for work, from a political standpoint it's good news for the obama generation. with unemployment insurance set to expire, the white house is stuck in an ironic situation. they are arguing for an extension. if growth is improved, it was announced thursday and friday down to 7% unemployment, the lowest in five years. the administration says that unemployment insurance has got to be extended. white house spokesman jay carney made the case on friday afternoon. >> the news we have today eenforces that we need to address the problem and extend unemployment insurance benefits to those individuals. this is a persistent problem. it would be terrible to do that to more than a million fa
. try campbell's homestyle soup. >>> the latest jobs report shows good signs for the economy. the unemployment rate dropped to 7% in november while 203,000 jobs were created. down from october's unemployment rate of 7.3%. these numbers come as many job seekers are preparing to take the traditional pause in their hubt for work in time for the holidays. but that may be a bad idea. john challenger is the ceo of challenger, gray and christmas. zachary karabell is a cnbc contributor. he's a writer as well. he's written a book as well. john, let me start with you. many folks put off their job search during the holidays thinking that companies don't hire during this time period. why is that not the right thing to do? >> first of all, the data doesn't support it. last november, over 4.66 million people found jobs in november, just slightly down in december. so it is a time when employers especially in this kind of 24/7/365 business environment we're in, they're always hiring. they always have issues. so the last thing you want to do is put your search on hold. the very fact that a lo
's the nature of democracy. it's a work in progress. and south africa, we see it as the largest economy, second largest economy on the continent. but it's a young democracy. it's taking those baby steps. it'll only be 20 years in 2014 that it has been a democracy. now, that doesn't mean that you forgive some of the missteps, but you go in there and work on them and find people who can hold people accountable. and i think that's where it's important for that country as well as in the countries relating to mandela to relate to his country and to help them realize the life of mandela. now it's up to those who are celebrating him today to tomorrow realize that dream, help realize that dream. >> great leadership is all about casting the vision. calling people to rise up to be better than they know how to be. certainly as you point out, that road map, the blueprint, it's there. charlayne hunter-gault, reverend al sharpton, great to see you. among those reacting to mandela's death is muhammad ali. he said he was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. today his spirit is soaring throug
-- demonstrations and police violence continued. the country's economy collapse. the anti-apartment movement it momentumked up abroad and nelson mandela became its symbol. mandela was eventually innsferred to another prison 1988 when he initiated secret negotiations with the government. in 1990, the ban on the anc was lifted. that year he walked out a free man. mandela was elected president of the anc in 1991. he continued to negotiate with president f.w. de klerk to seek an end to the country's racist laws. both men were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993. >> we can stop the forward movement of these forces in the country. inapartheid came to an end 1994 when black south africans were allowed to vote for the first time in the country's history. the anc won the harlem in three elections and nelson mandela was elected president of south africa. >> i stand before you filled with pride and joy. pride in the people of the country. determination -- enjoy that which you can loudly proclaim from the rooftops -- free at last. >> in june of 1999 after one presidential term, nelson mandela retired
know the economy is essential, and it's good he was meeting with secretary geithner, but here on his signature issue not to take charge. and i have no doubt the white house is right, that secretary sebelius was in several group meetings with the president about health care, but the whole point is, there was nobody in charge in the administration. the president was turning to and saying i look to you for overall responsibility, and in this case it should have been the secretary of health and human services. she does run the department that oversees this. and the fact that he was not meeting with her one-on-one, i think, frankly, is not so much an indictment of her but of the white house operation. >> which is fascinating because we saw her testify very publicly, she took full responsibility for what had happened, but at the same time if this was so important to the president, you would think that there was a lot more one-on-one interaction especially on something that's so critical to him and his policy. professor, the president went on msnbc this week, he was asked about his manageme
for the economy and washington in general. take a listen to what two lawmakers had to say earlier today. >> keep the budget caps in place, not raise taxes, which is important during this weak economy, and actually avoid a government shutdown. so i'm hopeful that even by the end of this week we'll be able to come together and achieve that. >> i certainly hope as part of it that the negotiators will take to heart what the president had to say. there are working families across america that are struggling. there are unemployed families who need a helping hand. we've got to protect and preserve the safety net in america and give these working families a fighting chance. >> so alex, of course there you have republican rob portman, democrat dick durbin. and you heard senator durbin talking about unemployment insurance. that is still the main sticking point. democrats, the president want unemployment insurance extended for 1.3 million americans. that's expected to expire at the end of the year. they say if that's not continued, it would be bad for those workers and also bad for the economy. republicans
the internet of everything. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ where does the united states get most of its energy? is it africa? the middle east? canada? or the u.s.? the answer is... the u.s. ♪ most of america's energy comes from right here at home. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. >>> welcome back to "the lead." i'm jake tapper. time for the world lead. he was a global icon for peace and nonviolence and his memorial service is obviously tomorrow. it's on pace to rival anything we have seen in decades in terms of size and security presence. among the throngs of mourners flocking to johannesburg right now to bid farewell to nelson mandela are 91 heads of st
government ministers stayed an extra day to over come hitches. it will boost economy by 1 trillion-dollar boost jobs by 20 million jobs. >> it was and a dramatic four-day long meeting in bally. suddenly the impossible was discussible. >> for the first time in our history, it has really delivered. >> they have accepted a deal that will bring down some of the trade bear areas worldwide. it's a smaller package than was on the original deal in 2001 but it could bring in wider agreements to come. also it will be more transparent which will make it easier worldwide. and countries like india will be able to protect it's country for food subsidies. many in the united states it would affect world market prices. >> i view this as a victory for the farmers of india, for the farmers and the countries that india was able to put together with its partners which withstood all pressures and demonstrated solidarity and achieved this. >> not everyone is happy with the deal. farmers organizations and activists say that farmers in the developing countries will suffer from free trade. >> by including
about klein because we know a lot of drops in sales have happened in china even though the economy there grew 8% in the third quarter. how does this impact the u.s. economy, as well? >> that's right. these are some of the most important companies to the u.s. economy. and already some are reporting their competitors in europe are stealing their business simply because these companies are able to say that they can offer better privacy protections and they don't have to help the sa snoop. microsoft's general counsel wrote in a blog post that customers won't use technology they don't trust. he says the government puts that trust at risk and the government has to help restore it, suzanne. >> evan, thank you so much. a lot of people are just thinking you can't -- there's no guarantee of privacy wherever you are. >> as i said, hardly the nsa but a lot of those companies have been accused of collecting plenty of data about us, as well. >> information. >> it's not the same thing about you. >> not altruistic. >> not at all. an american singer, check this out, not arab, nearly took the top pr
a the economy became the most famous prisoner in the world. the powerful international condemnation, and growing domestic unrest chipped away atar par tide until finally mandela was released from prison. it was february 11th, 1990, the streets flowed with joy. vowing never to go back to what he called the black held of apartheid. i have spoken about in my lifetime. your brothers, your commitment, and your discipline. has released me to stand before you today. >> but freedom wasn't easy. mandela negotiating with president fw declerk to reform the government had to play peace keeper, trying to temper escalading violence anc, and supporters of the freedom barty, who wanted no part of negotiations with the government that had helped him down for so long. thousands were killed in black on black fighting. also, his marriage to winny mandela, a powerful political force herself was crumbling, the woman who supported him so publicly during the long years of incarceration was accused of having affaired and being linked to some of the violence in south africa. they finally deviced. through it all, he led t
and the violence focused the word on the racism. boycotts choked off the economy, mandela became the most famous prisoner in the word. the off international condemnation and growing domestic unrest chipped away at apartheid until finally mandela was released from prison. it was february 11th, 1990, the streets flowed with joy. and the man who had become a powerful symbol of resistence, walked free. >> vowing never to go back to what he called the black held of apartheid. >> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. your discipline, your commitment, has lift me to stand before you today. but freedom wasn't easy, to reform the government has to play peace keeper trying to temper escalading violence between his party and supporters of the freedom party who wanted no part of negotiations with the government that had helped them down for so down. thousands were killed. also his marriage to winny mandela, a powerful political force herself was crumbling. the woman who supported him so publicly, was accused of having affairs and some of the murder rouse violence. they finally divorced. through it all
on that. >> hi there, kate. let's talk about the jobs report in a moment. your economy is three things, jobs, investments and housing. we think of it as the three corners of the triangle. you need all of those for your personal finances and to grow your wealth. small businesses, they seem to be hiring more than the big businesses are by the way. auto sales have been up. you have the signals that are showing the economy doing a little bit better. >> when you're talking about the economy doing better, let's talk about housing. you say there's good news there. >> that's one very important part of your finance triangle. 3% home growth is what zillow was forecasting. mortgage rates moving up, 4.46%. that's not necessarily bad. why? it says the banks might start writing more loans next year. >> historically they're still very low. >> very low, absolutely. anything under 5% is still very low. >> good news. why is the stock market still stalling? >> that's interesting. five down days for stocks over the past week. your 401(k) is up double digits this year, no question. you've seen really good
on cnn. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> memorials are growing and people in south africa are celebrating the life of nelson mandela, the civil rights icon died thursday at the age of 95. cnn's robin kurnow is live outside his home in johannesburg where it really is a place of holding vigil, at the same time celebrating his life. >> reporter: absolutely. it's like a pilgrimage here. south africans doing what they always do, they sing in times of happiness and in times of hardship. and this noise, this celebration, this la meant you hear behind me has been going on literally since thursday night. people singing over and over again, nelson mandela, nelson mandela, there's no one like you. now, many of these south africans behind me felt like they had a personal closeness with nelson mandela. they owe so much to him. and he had that way with people. his family saying today that he had time for everyone, kings and queens, rich or poor, great or small. and, in fact, one of those people was bill clinto
perception of the economy may not have quite caught up. only a quarter of people polled said they believe the economy is getting better. deb? >> alexandra, thanks so much. >> in south africa, ten days of mourning under way for the man many called madiba. also, the nsa, what might they have been peeking into any time? here's a hint it, could have just been in your pocket. that's coming up. we're aig. and we're here. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is... 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energy efficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lives
economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. . >>> nelson mandela's compassion, hum humanity, humility touches millions all over the world. peter turnley was there the day mandela was released from prison more than 20 years ago. he described the moments that followed in his own words. >> nelson mandela's example, his courage, his determination, his dignity, his forward thinking of conciliation, of forgiveness and of love for all is something that has touched so many people and it has been something that has brought people towards him and brought people together. on the morning of february 11th, 1990 i was with a group of photographers. we had gotten to the prison very early that morning. at one point in the early afternoon, i will never forget suddenly about five helicopters began to descend right over the back of this
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the thinking at the moment is the economy could be strong enough to handle it. >>> amc, it's all about that stock, a little popcorn, a little stock. amc theaters gearing up to go public at the new york stock exchange expected to happen at the end of the month and it will reward its most loyal 2.5 million customers, they have a chance to buy shares usually reserved for the big investors. in a letter from the company's ceo from jerry lopez, he says members of the amc stubs rewards program will be offered the same price as the big banks and large wall street institutions, meaning the little guy gets to buy the shares a day before they go public so finally, john, finally the little guy can get in on the action, just like the big guys. john? >> maybe a little hot buttered stock to go with your popcorn and movie. >> there you go. >> alison kosik, thanks so much, appreciate it. >>> checking some of the top story this is morning, american airlines and u.s. airway also officially become the world's largest airline today after the merger beat a number of legal challenges. the new company will be
the economy of the country. people are running away, people are disappointed and our business men are not investing. money dealers are worried because they cannot work confidently. >> as afghans panic, the afghani is devalued. prices are going up. it is at ordinary markets like this where regular afghans come to spend their hard earned currency buying food, but food prices have gone up significantly in the past few days. that's because the people who sell the food buy in dollars. and the afghanis don't bias much food and the food anchorag shors not been so pad. sacks of food has risen. >> the prices have become so high before we could buy one at a cheaper price but now it's expensive and there's less money and people are so poor they can't afford to buy anything. >> as anxiety hangs over the country's diplomatic future with the u.s., it has quickly affected the things they do worry about. simply putting food on the table. jane ferguson, al jazeera, kabul, afghanistan. >>> the pullout of american forces could jeopardize $8 billion a yore, that's how much the americans have pledged
, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e encouraging news when it comes to the economy. the unemployment rate has turned to its lowest rate in five years. kristen welker has more. >> reporter: the economy added 203,000 jobs in november. surprising some economists say, especially in the wake of the government shutdown and they say it could be an indication the recovery is about to take off, despite the political gridlock here in the nation's capital. neil bloomen that is all launched up this eye store three years ago in new york. these days he sees signs the economy is recovering. >> we have more than doubled in sales and next year, we are planning to high about 150 people. >> reporter: that hiring trend reflects what is happening throughout the country with news friday that employers added more than 200,000 jobs for each of the last four months. in november, many were good paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care. 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we are getting consistent job reports plus 200 and that is positive and positive not only for the econ
a sixth of our entire national economy. >> awe con -- au contraire. you quote valerie jarrett. >> you have a president, and all presidents have a sense of their vulnerabilities but they need to surround thhmselves with people who recognize their shortcomings. the president in a sense is very detached. he's not great at the hands-on at management. he's essentially admitted that. but people like valerie jarrett around him don't challenge that. they reenforce this notion that he's so brilliant that he's bored with these meetingsant doesn't need to participate. >> she says the problem is president obama knows how smart he is and he's been bored to death his whole life. he's too talented to do what ordinary people do. he would never be satisfied with what ordinary people do. >> because he is up there and we are down here. >> that sound like me. >> it does. >> exactly like me. >> you're not president. it's coming. >> here's the big picture, the one thing i look at right now is the president of the united states either has to back up this plan, get behind the plan, or actually distance himself ab
low in fact but a tick upwards. so what you got here is a sign of some strength in the economy, some renewed hope that maybe we're breaking beyond the new normal. i can tell you now, martha. the reaction the stock market is exuberant. you will see the dow go up about 100 points plus minutes from now. martha: it's interesting, stuart. you know the next conversation will be, well, you know, are things heating up to the point where we need to kind of pull back the reins on the money we've been pushing into this market and that might send the stock market in another direction. >> maybe, but today with signs of strength in the labor market and economy, yes we'll have a nice rally for the stock market. maybe we'll postponing the idea maybe the federal reserve will print less money. maybe then the stock market will go down. celebrate while you can, martha, because we're up about 130 points right now. lori: take a moment to enjoy that. stuart, thank you very much. >> sure. bill: extreme weather now. look out for this. there is arctic air blasting center of the u.s. bringing subzero temperatu
their heads the past few days how strong the economy is because we are getting good economic news. i want to be clear on that. look at the numbers. below 300,000. i keep putting an asterisk. see that? each of these comes with a little bit of an asterisk. gdp companies ramping up on their inventories and now have to sell them. you still got mortgage rates so low that that has been very good for home buyers but i think you're going to see mortgage rates moving up, john. i think they -- we have seen them moving up 4.46% yesterday we learned was the 30-year fixed mortgage rate. 5% i think next year and seems it could be bad, right? except, except people like circumstances circumstances -- it could be a good thing and loosen up the market. >> what is your expectation for the jobs report today? 180,000 and comes out this morning. the jobs rate probably fell 7.2% and this is an important number. the economy looks like it's getting better, john. we want to see this trend continue. are we turning a corner? and does that mean the stock market stops rallying? >> big decisive jobs report and no one c
to the economy. sounds like good news, but some economists say the numbers mask a pervasive problem just beneath the surface. record high unemployment among young americans. put these numbers into context, economist in the university of maryland business professor is here with us. good morning. >> good morning. >> so these numbers are being trumpeted all around by the president's supporters on various broadcasts we did yesterday as great news, but you say they're not what they appear to be. why? >> well, simply, the quality of jobs are not very good and most young people really are having a terrible time getting started in careers. you know, college graduates are still working at starbucks and the like, and we have a lot of college graduates who are really graduate students, not learning very much, because they can't find a job. piling up a lot of debt and so forth. >> so at what point is this assumption that every person needs to go a four-year college and then get a graduate degree going to fold under the weight of the counterevidence maybe it's smarter to join the work force earlier? >> i thi
invest. it's everyday reinvesting for your personal economy. be careful babe. [ doorbell rings ] let's see what's cookin'. look at this. that's a swiffer. i don't have to climb up. did you notice how clean it looks? morty are you listening? morty? [ morty ] i'm listening! i want you to know. and i had like this four wheninch band of bumpslestening? it started on my back. that came around to the front of my body. and the pain from it was- it was excruciating. i did not want anyone to brush into me to cause me more pain than i was already enduring. i wanted to just crawl up in a ball and just, just wait till it passed. it's holiday time, and no fruit is as versatile as our ocean spray cranberries, which is why were declaring it the unofficial official fruit of the holidays! the fig's gonna be so bummed. [ laughs ] for holiday tips and recipes, go to oceanspray.com. ♪ >> osgood: carefree highway is just one of the songs that earned gordon lightfoot a secure place in the ranks of modern singer/songwriters. this morning he talk to john blackstone for the record. ♪ >> we begin with a w
is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. when you see disney's rapunzel at walmart, you snag it. mom, you own this season. get the hottest gifts, all backed by our christmas ad match guarantee. rated e10+. walmart. they're made of 88% active ingredients. and the competition clocks in at 13%. so with tide pods, you know what you get, and what you get is an amazing clean. so try tide pods. why? the proof is in the pop. in her favorite color? diamonds that capture her look, her style perfectly. kay jewelers presents the artistry diamonds collection. genuine diamonds, in vivid blues, greens, blacks, yellows and purples. the beauty of genuine diamonds in a palette of colors that express "her" perfectly. at kay, the number one jewelry store in america. artistry diamonds. they're diamonds of a different color.
on the health of the u.s. economy, as the government releases the monthly jobs report. one survey found private companies added 215,000 jobs last month, beating expectations. >> looking at today's weather. rainy in the northeast. icy from the great lakes into texas. below zero in the northern plains. it will be even normally toasty. l.a. will stay in the 50s. >>> finally this morning, a parting tribute to nelson mandela. >> the leader, the pioneer and one of the world's most influential icons remembered this morning across the globe from people of all walks of life. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands. >> it was tremendous. it was just tremendous. there was a lot of excitement. the electricity in the air. and he was truly one of the great, great heroes of our time. >> i just want to say, it's extremely sad and tragic news. we're reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. >> he showed us, with the clerk and the african in a how to build a nation. still has so much to go. but much further ah
. the economy has added an average of 202,000 jobs a month from august to october. the unemployment level stands at 7.3%. indications that the fed may cut back its economic stimulus sent stocks lower on wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost 68 points, its fifth straight day of decline. the nasdaq fell four points. asian markets were cautious ahead of the u.s. jobs report. tokyo's nikkei gained nearly 1% and hong kong's hang seng added nearly a fraction. general motors is pulling most of its brand from europe. it will end by 2016. gm says it will concentrate its european efforts on its european made opal brand. they'll offer the corvette throughout europe. >>> and fast food workers demonstrated for higher wages yesterday. protests and work stoppages were held across the country. the effort to raise the minimum wage to $16 an hour began about a year ago led by the service employees international union. >>> and when a tennessee couple ordered breakfast at mcdonald's, they got bucks instead. greg and stacy terry found three bags filled with money. it turned out the restaurant's deposit
releases its jobs report for the month of november. many hope it will show the economy added 180,000 jobs last month. if that is the case many experts believe it could signal the job market is picking up speed. they expect it to dip to 7.2%. >>> also today security will be tight around parts of downtown washington as people from around the world watch the annual lighting of the national christmas tree. megan mcgrath is live with what you need to know. megan? >> reporter: well, eun, the big show gets under way at 5:00 tonight. there's a preshow that starts at 4:30 this afternoon. all-star lineup. mariah carey, aretha franklin, all performing as part of the show. now i'm joined by jennifer with the national park service. talk a little bit about this year's show and i should mention right now we're showing video from last year. >> oh, terrific. thank you for coming to one of america's national parks. we're gearing up for the 91st annual christmas tree lighting. we expect mariah carey, aretha franklin, arturo sandoval and folks can go to nationalparks.0 org to see the full lineup. let's just
to a historic a global deal aimed at boosting contacts that could add nearly one trillion to the global economy by simplifying customs procedures of the deal falls far short of the dts ambitious goal of tearing down the global trade barriers. the accord does mark the first global agreement struck by the body since its founding in nineteen ninety five. an american citizen detained in north korea for over a month is now on its way home the five year old veteran that mehlman has been held on charges of hostile acts which pyongyang said he committed six decades ago during the korean war. the less well from north korea's decision to release the former soldier was now on appeal the sentences go. people are in detention in mexico at this saturday's all in the theft of a truck carrying highly radioactive material the seizure of the vehicle to grid notices to the us and the lands and nuclear watchdog amid fears the material could have been used to make it dirty bomb the notices of reports the hospital is on high alert six men suspected of stealing a truck containing radioactive material i be treated if
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